5 Ways to Prevent Skin Irritation After Shaving

5 Ways to Prevent Skin Irritation After Shaving
February 1, 2017 Peter Minkoff
In How To Guides

Regardless of your skin type, if you shave on a daily basis, you have definitely experienced some skin irritation and even cut yourself from time to time. The sure way around this issue is to grow out your beard. But, if this is not the look that you particularly like, there are ways to minimize and even prevent skin irritation after shaving. Take a look at the following tips, which can make your life easier and less painful.

Barber Shaving

Bearded man skilfully shaven by a professional barber

Soften the beard beforehand

Most razor burns occur because the beard hair is too stubbly and thick. As you try to remove the hairs, the razor will pull at your skin, which will cause a burn afterwards. One of the best ways to make your beard soft and easy to shave is to start shaving once you’re done with the shower. Hot steam will soften the beard nicely. But if you want an extra touch of softness, apply some hair conditioner to your beard and keep it on during the shower. Thanks to this trick, the hairs will be much easier to remove without tugging at your skin.

Use the right tools

When it comes to safety razors, there are tons of options on the market. While the most popular razors definitely include those with multiple blades, these might be the main reason for skin irritation. Even though these razors remove hair effectively, they also damage the skin the most. In that respect, try using good old-school straight razors. If you can’t get the technique quite right, safety razors can also significantly minimize the burn.

Proper shaving products

Apart from an adequate razor, you should also use shaving products that work the best for your particular needs. Again, there are many choices in the market and it all depends on your preferences. You can opt for shaving soaps or shaving creams, but under no circumstances should you try to shave your beard with just water and razor. Soaps and creams allow the razor to glide easier. These also create a protective barrier for your skin, which is essential when you expose your face to something sharp.

barber-shaving-close

The final pass of an excellently scenic barber straight razor shave

Soothe the skin afterwards

The unfortunate truth is that even with proper shaving products your razor will still damage your skin. Therefore, it’s important to soothe and cool it down afterwards. After-shave gels and lotions can help you with that. It would be best to use after-shave products that are targeted for sensitive skin. The ingredients found in these products can help your skin heal and prevent the irritation from spreading. In general, use gentle patting motions to apply the after-shave, so that it can sink into the skin properly without making it too oily.

What about cuts?

Even if you’re really careful, sometimes you may get a razor cut from shaving. While you should sterilize your razor with alcohol, you shouldn’t apply creams and ointments that contain alcohol directly on the cuts. This can only irritate your skin more. Instead, use products that are specially made to reduce scars and boost the skin’s natural healing process. For example, paw paw for scars is a multipurpose cream that will soothe rashes and burns, prevent scarring and moisturize dry skin.

Skin Irritation Gone

If you want to say goodbye to skin irritations after shaving forever, you need to put some effort into finding the right tools and products. Also, it’s not only about what you do after the shave, but before as well. If you can skip a day or two between the shaves, this could give your skin enough time to heal and regenerate properly. Using razor on already irritated skin will only make the matter worse.

About The Author

Peter is a men’s grooming & fashion writer at The Beard Mag & High Street Gent magazines from UK. Beside writing he worked as a menswear fashion stylist for many fashion events around UK & AU. Follow Peter on Twitter for more grooming tips.

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